The one thing you have that nobody else has is your story

Posts from the “Art Story” Category

Services for Seniors

Posted on February 17, 2017

brochure

If you know of someone who could benefit from creating art stories with us, please utilize this brochure by handing out to residents in your community, as well as families who have loved ones struggling with complex age-related issues:

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Bringing Art to Life–an article for Art Therapy Today

Posted on May 8, 2016

It was a joy to write this article for Art Therapy Today!

To read the full text, click here: Bringing Art to Life through Storytelling

art to life

To read the full text, click here: Bringing Art to Life through Storytelling

 

Magazine Heads

Posted on May 4, 2016

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Made by seniors with Alzheimer’s and dementia. It’s a great exercise in creativity and story telling. This project is also a good assessment to see where an individual is at in regards to constructing a figure and remembering body parts.

Stories; fragile, yet outlasting

Posted on May 1, 2016

“Stories, like people and butterflies and songbirds’ eggs and human hearts and dreams, are also fragile things, made up of nothing stronger or more lasting than twenty-six letters and a handful of punctuation marks. Or they are words on the air, composed of sounds and ideas–abstract, invisible gone once they’ve been spoken–and what could be more frail than that? But some stories, small, simple ones about setting out on adventures or people doing wonders, tales of miracles and monsters, have outlasted all the people who told them, and some of them have outlasted the lands in which they were created.”

–Neil Gaiman, Fragile Things

Buzzing Around

Posted on March 4, 2015

I have a memory of the very first time a bee stung me. I was about 5 and playing on a playground in my bare feet. I stepped on a bee and… OUCH!

I’m not sure how this painting was started. Honestly, it was a painting that had been initiated years ago by another art therapist, and I came across it hiding under a pile of things in the art closet. After our group worked on it, It looks entirely different now.

A participant told a story of how his Dad kept bees, and one day he made the poor decision to investigate–resulting in many, many bee stings. Others told stories of their own encounters with bees. And while we were story-telling, we passed the canvas around, each participant dipping their thumb in yellow paint to make a bee on the canvas.

In the end, participants all loved how their painting turned out… even if it did evoke memories of being stung!